Afghan Hound

Quick facts

Afghan Hound AKC Group: Hound
Height: 26-28 Inches Male, 24-26 Inches Female
Weight: 60 pounds Male, 50 pounds female
Colors: dark brown, creamy beige, black
AKC recognized in: 1926

Afghan Hounds are also referred to as Kabul Hounds and Balkh Hounds. Interchangeably, they can be called Baluchi Hounds and Barutzy Hounds. They are characterized by a rather lengthy head, a slender muzzle, an arched neck, long ears, and almond-shaped eyes. What's most notable about the Afghan Hound is its majestic, silky hair and long, curved tail.

The Afghan Hound is a member of the greyhound family. True to its name, the origin of the Afghan Hound is the country of Afghanistan. Native to the Afghan mountains, these hounds are used to hunting food. Quick to give chase and alert to the scent of prey like hare, gazelle, wolf, and snow leopard, they are perfect for hunting.

The first Afghan Hounds were introduced to England courtesy of British soldiers posted in Afghanistan sometime in 1890. This was a turning point in what we know of as the Second Afghan War.

It wasn't until 1926 rhat the first Afghan Hounds were brought over to the United States and only in the 1930's when they were finally recognized as a breed. Incidentally, this transition was pioneered by one Asra of Ghanzi and another Westmill Omar who were brought back to the United States by Zeppo Marx for breeding.


Temperament

Afghan Hound Summary
Affection one paw
Cold Tolerance three paws
Ease of Training two paws
Energy level two paws
Exercise Requirements three paws
Friendliness : Children three paws
Friendliness: Other Animals three paws
Friendliness: Other Pets three paws
Grooming Requirements four paws
Heat Tolerance three paws
Playfulness three paws
Protection Ability one paw
Watchdog Ability three paws

How exactly do you approach a breed of dogs who behave like they come from a noble lineage? True to its kingly nature, the Afghan Hound is quite a majestic creature.

Majestic as they are, Afghan Hounds can be trained and made to obey. Discipline these hounds in a calm yet firm manner, and you will discover how sweet and loyal they are. They respond well to kindness in training since shyness and sensitivity come naturally to them. Once you get them to socialize, they would be turn out to be gay and spirited.

Pet Afghan Hounds are especially-prized and well-loved by their owners. Their aloof and dignified nature won't be a hindrance at all if you appreciate how unique and individual their personalities are. They get along well with members of the family and prove to be good companions. With strangers, they may remain aloof and suspicious without being hostile.

Snobbish in nature, these dogs show much of the elegant, elitist attitude common to their breed. Aristocratic as they are, these hounds are not meant to be show dogs. They are sharp yet shy and timid to a fault. However, with a little effort on your part, the Afghan Hound you adopt and train would stand out and excel in any dog show.

Health and Exercise

When you picture Afghan Hounds, think of sheer speed and pure energy! See them gallop a distance of 40 miles per hour. Watch them leap a height of 7 feet high from basically a standing position.

Despite its elegant coat and graceful appearance, the Afghan Hound is noted for its large and powerful feet. These are designed to climb the rocky terrain of its native homeland. The best breeds for show have feet which are long and wide and toes which are arched.

Even when they're already domesticated, Afghan Hounds still carry that same basic instinct to chase animals and hunt for prey. This trait makes it so important for you to give them just the right amount of exercise and activity in the outdoors.

Well taken care of, Afghan Hounds can outlast their average lifespan of 12 years and live to a fruitful age of 14-18. Aside from cancers and allergies, one of their common ailments would be a lung problem known as chylothorax.

When they're healthy and robust, these dogs do know how to socialize. They can give birth to as many as 15 puppies, although the typical litter consists of around eight.

Visitor Comments

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