Clumber Spaniel

Quick facts

Clumber Spaniel AKC Group: Sporting
Height: 19-20 inches male; 17-19 inches female
Weight: 70-85 lbs male; 55-70 lbs female
Colors: White with orange or lemon markings (the fewer markings the better)
AKC recognized in: 1884

A heavy bone structure supporting a stocky build, a massive head with a broad muzzle, a heavy brow with a large nose and droopy ears to top it all off. Mix these parts together, and you come up with an image of a peaceful, tranquil and drowsy dog at your side.

This image is, however, not entirely true for our stocky little Clumber Spaniels. Their heavy frame makes them ideal for rushing through heavy cover, and they excel at flushing out hidden fowl in this heavy cover – most especially pheasants and partridges. Their good swimming skills and natural tendency to retrieve make things a whole lot easier on your part.

That is, of course, if you train your Clumber Spaniel to be a gundog and retriever. Most owners prefer to keep the Clumber as a pet and companion rather than hunting partner, which is not that hard to do at all.

Not only is the Clumber the stockiest of all spaniels, it is also among the oldest. It is thought that this breed dates to the late 1700s, with a cross between the heavy-headed Alpine Spaniel and the low-bodied Basset Hound. The name is thought to be derived from Clumber Park, the estate of the Duke of Newcastle. Around the time of the French Revolution, the Duc de Noailles moved his spaniel kenels from France to there

The Chesapeake Bay Retriever also has webbed feet, specifically designed to help it swim through water with greater ease. It is pretty surprising, considering most other dogs have paws with no such webbing in the first place.


Temperament

Clumber Spaniel Summary
Affection four paws
Cold Tolerance three paws
Ease of Training three paws
Energy level two paws
Exercise Requirements two paws
Friendliness : Children three paws
Friendliness: Other Animals three paws
Friendliness: Other Pets four paws
Grooming Requirements three paws
Heat Tolerance two paws
Playfulness three paws
Protection Ability one paw
Watchdog Ability two paws

Among the Spaniels, the Clumber is perhaps the most docile and ‘sleepy’ gundog you can raise and call your own.

Its gentle affection towards others goes well with its natural playfulness and well-behaved demeanor. They get along well with dogs, cats and other animals that they have been raised with.

Other major points that mark the Clumber include a good memory, an easygoing personality and an aversion to barking. These qualities put together make the Clumber a very easy dog to train. Just remember to be gentle but firm in your commands, and the natural obedience of the Clumber will do the rest.

However, you do have to be careful about the nosy nature of the clumber as well as its tendency to chew on things. A carelessly opened cabinet or an exposed sofa will prove to be attractive targets for a Clumber to raid.

Health and Exercise

The Clumber Spaniel has a life span of between 10 and 12 years.

One interesting fact about Clumbers: they are bursting to the seams with energy while young, but start to become more reserved and toned down once they have matured.

This toning down of activity levels means that you have to take your Clumber Spaniels on long walks, giving them an opportunity to exercise and explore their environment. The clumber can be very comfortable in an apartment, however, but you will have to bring them out for more exercise as they are very inactive when indoors all the time.

This is especially important for Clumber Spaniels, as they are susceptible to a range of genetic maladies. Entropion, ectropion, hypothyroidism, panosteitis, cataracts, hip dysplasia and dry eyes are some of the more common ones.

Clumbers are also susceptible to more mediocre headaches as well. You have to watch out for snoring, wheezing, drooling, shedding and weight gain when you have a Clumber in the house.

All of these issues can be resolved by good grooming, good training, good veterinary care and good selection of breed.

Visitor Comments

This is your chance to add your feedback. Do you have a Clumber Spaniel in your family, or know one in someone elses? Do you have a story to tell related to that Clumber Spaniel? Or maybe you have more questions that either DogNation.net or another of our visitors might be able to help you with? Feel free to add your comment or question below.


Comments

No comments yet.

Add Comment

* Required information
(never displayed)
 
Bold Italic Underline Strike Superscript Subscript Quote Line Bullet Numeric
 
Smile Sad Huh Laugh Mad Tongue Crying Grin Wink Scared Cool Sleep Blush Unsure Shocked
 
1000
What is the opposite word of small?
 
Enter answer:
Captcha
Refresh
 
Enter code:
 
Notify me of new comments via email.
 
Remember my form inputs on this computer.
 
I have read and understand the privacy policy. *
 
I have read and agree to the terms and conditions. *
 
Get your 10 part series and start eliminating your dog's behavior issues now!






Your Privacy is important to us! We will not share any information you provide.
RANDOM QUOTE
You think those dogs will not be in heaven! I tell you they will be there long before any of us.
Robert Louis Stevenson

click me
© 2007, 2012 DogNation.net   | Privacy Policy  | Affiliate Compensation Disclosure